The Next Step — Rediscovering the Whole Person


The landscape for alcohol and substance abuse recovery has been dominated for 80 years by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its guiding principles The Twelve Steps which became the gold standard for recovery. While the program is credited with helping millions of people around the world, the gold is losing some of its luster. The National Academy of Sciences in a 1990 report to Congress noted AA’s “lack of well-designed and well-executed studies that can be cited to support or negate the validity” of its claim to be “the most successful treatment for persons with alcohol problems.” To date, that scientific … Continue reading

Staying Sharp: Q&A with Doctors Henry Emmons & David Alter


By Women in Recovery In their new book Staying Sharp, doctors Henry Emmons and David Alter have combined the latest neuroscience research with ageold wisdom about resilience, mindfulness, and stress reduction to show that vibrant aging is within reach. Together they demonstrate how to blend the best of modern science and Eastern holistic medicine to form a powerful drug-free program that will maintain a youthful mind and a happy life. We posed some questions to the doctors on how to live more joyfully, age more gracefully, and build intimacy in our relationships, no matter what our age. Q. What happens … Continue reading

Do I Really Need to put up with my Crazy Family

John Driggs

It never fails. About this time of year every year I start getting a pain in my gut and dread with no clear explanation why. Upon later reflection I realize why. It’s because I have to see my family — who are incredibly crazy… and the holidays are coming. I feel guilty thinking this way. Shouldn’t I feel grateful for even having a family? Doesn’t everybody have to put up with relatives they don’t like? Am I not responsible to love them all no matter how they act? After all, my relatives are family. They are the only family I … Continue reading

Sometimes, Ya Just Gotta Laugh


I’ve come to the conclusion that God put me on this planet to make people in sobriety and recovery laugh. This is the story of my journey to sobriety/ recovery. I was the attention-starved middle child of a typical middle-class family. Dad was in sales so we moved a lot. I learned how to make friends quickly by being the class clown. As an adult, I started using drugs so I could drink more. I never thought I had a problem. My Dad, having been an alcoholic, was in the program later in life. I remember my dad taking a … Continue reading

The Joy of Half a Cookie: Using Mindfulness to Lose Weight and End the Struggle with Food


By Jean Kristeller with Alisa Bowman Perigee Based upon many years of experience and research, Kristeller identifies the myths of dieting. Using mindfulness practices specifically targeting eating, she helps readers understand why they overeat and how to change their relationship with food. To do that, she suggests letting go of calorie anxiety and incorporate mindfulness meditations. She provides information to help break the habit of mindless eating and establish a better relationship with food. In each chapter there are practices to help the reader better understand how emotional experiences and eating are related; these exercises help deepen one’s awareness and … Continue reading

Choosing a Good Life: Lessons from People Who Have Found Their Place in the World


By Ali Berman Hazelden Publishing Berman interviewed ten people from diverse backgrounds to discover the key to balance and fulfilment. She learned how they achieved harmony despite unimaginable hardships, illness, and loss. She shares their stories here. When asked how they handled stress, some stated that they asked themselves, “Can I do something about it or can’t I?” They told her they changed the way they processed negative information. Berman says that following their examples, she is now living the life she wants and that she no longer fells “overwhelmed, tired, and deeply unhappy.” If you have a favorite book … Continue reading

The Tao of Happiness: Stories from Chuang Tzu for Your Spiritual Journey


By Derek Lin Tarcher Penguin Lin reviews parables from Tzu, a Taoist philosopher who lived twenty-four hundred years ago and influenced Chinese culture through stories. He incorporates these translated teachings into today’s Western world. For example, “The end of one’s life marks the completion of one’s work.” Therefore, instead of mourning the death of a loved one, Tzu taught that it made more sense to celebrate a life well lived. Another example, “May you go far in life, live up to your potential, and achieve great things,” is translated from a story where the flight of a bird that transforms … Continue reading

Finding the Blue Sky: A Mindful Approach to Choosing Happiness Here and Now


By Joseph Emet TarcherPerigee Positive Psychology is the scientific study of what actually makes people happy and what makes life most worth living. Emet trained with Thich Nhat Hanh and shares how Positive Psychology compliments Buddhism. Each chapter has three sections: a story, a meditation or reflection, and a practice section with exercises to help the reader integrate the message. Emet recommends that readers choose to read the book in the order it was written, chapter by chapter, or randomly select a page and see what it brings. If you have a favorite book you’d like to share with other … Continue reading

NuWay Annual Picnic


SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 FROM 3:00 – 6:00 P.M. NuWay is celebrating 50 years In the Heart of the Recovery Community.

What’s the Trick to Fulfillment?


By William Schiemann, Ph.D Are there real tricks to becoming fulfilled in life? You bet. Research suggests that there are key streetsmart actions that those who are most fulfilled use every day in their professional and personal lives. I interviewed over 100 successful people — some who were fulfilled and others who were not — to understand why success does not always bring about fulfillment. There was amazing convergence around several things that fulfilled people do at work and home. Here are the top five: 1. Have strong values — and stick with them. Does your work environment, family and … Continue reading

Slogans: YOU’RE LOOKING AT THE PROBLEM (To be placed on mirror)

There’s no doubt in my mind that the numerous slogans I’ve heard repeatedly over the years in the rooms of A.A. have impacted my psyche one degree to another. Perhaps the most familiar commonsense catchphrase “One day at a Time” has definitely helped carry me through countless rough and tumble days in my sobriety. The famous A.A. saying “First things First” has often come in handy as a gentle reminder to slow down when I’ve felt overwhelmed by a bombardment of thoughts rushing into my head too quickly. The frequently heard tried and true line “Easy does It” has rarely … Continue reading

On Finding Forgiveness


“When you forgive, you in no way change the past – but you sure do change the future.” Bernard Meltzer Why is it so hard to forgive? We can carry our hurts and injuries like precious gems in a velvet pouch, admiring their many facets, their high cost, how they refract the light of what once was. We recall their origins, their rarity, how durable they are. How could I ever manage without them? Who would I be? Over time these gems take on a life of their own. As we protect them, they grow in power and value. We … Continue reading

2118 NuWay Counseling Center Open for Business


Located in the newly Renovated Historic Pillsbury Snyder Mansion in South Minneapolis, the 2118 NuWay Counseling Center Open for Business. Minneapolis—NuWay, a 50-year-old nonprofit organization that provides extended care treatment for substance abusers headquartered and founded in the heart of the recovery community, has opened an outpatient facility in the historic Pillsbury Snyder mansion at 2118 Blaisdell Ave. S. The house was built in 1913 for John Pillsbury Snyder, and his wife Nelle, who had survived the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. He was the grandson of John S. Pillsbury, former governor and co-founder of the Pillsbury Company. The … Continue reading

Learning Spaces


“The roots of education are bitter, the fruit is sweet.” – Aristotle How could a 15-year-old girl be considered a threat to the Taliban? On October 9, 2012, in the Swat valley of northwestern Pakistan, a gunman stepped onto a bus in which Malala Yousafzai was returning home from school and shot her in the head. Not because of religious, ethnic or social differences; but because she was an outspoken advocate for education. At just 11 years of age she had spoken out against the Taliban edict forbidding girls to be educated. She gave a talk entitled, “How dare the … Continue reading

Hidden Shame: A Curse and a Blessing

John Driggs

Hidden shame is a powerful emotional and physiological reaction. It fills our being in covert ways. It can cause us to become violent or withdrawn from life and it can prompt us to bring out the better parts of ourselves in ways we never expected. It is both a curse and a blessing. Typically we may have some glimmer of how it operates in our lives but mostly we’re unaware of how much of our existence is driven by shame. It is often the obscured answer to such questions as: “Why did he murder all those people? or “Why can’t … Continue reading

Restoring Resilience


“Resilience is our essential nature, woven into our being as a natural capacity to restore and recover so that we can experience the joy and well being that are our birthright.” Dr. Henry Emmons, MD What is resilience? Is it strength, persistence, courage? Do you think about your resilience or another’s? Is resilience acquired or innate? “Resiliency is the rapidity with which we recover from adversity,” according to Richard Davidson, founder of The Center for Healthy Minds at UW-Madison. It is a learnable skill. By strengthening that skill we can recover from adversity more quickly. We cannot, however, avoid it. … Continue reading