2118 NuWay Counseling Center Open for Business

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Located in the newly Renovated Historic Pillsbury Snyder Mansion in South Minneapolis, the 2118 NuWay Counseling Center Open for Business. Minneapolis—NuWay, a 50-year-old nonprofit organization that provides extended care treatment for substance abusers headquartered and founded in the heart of the recovery community, has opened an outpatient facility in the historic Pillsbury Snyder mansion at 2118 Blaisdell Ave. S. The house was built in 1913 for John Pillsbury Snyder, and his wife Nelle, who had survived the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. He was the grandson of John S. Pillsbury, former governor and co-founder of the Pillsbury Company. The … Continue reading

Learning Spaces

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“The roots of education are bitter, the fruit is sweet.” – Aristotle How could a 15-year-old girl be considered a threat to the Taliban? On October 9, 2012, in the Swat valley of northwestern Pakistan, a gunman stepped onto a bus in which Malala Yousafzai was returning home from school and shot her in the head. Not because of religious, ethnic or social differences; but because she was an outspoken advocate for education. At just 11 years of age she had spoken out against the Taliban edict forbidding girls to be educated. She gave a talk entitled, “How dare the … Continue reading

Hidden Shame: A Curse and a Blessing

John Driggs

Hidden shame is a powerful emotional and physiological reaction. It fills our being in covert ways. It can cause us to become violent or withdrawn from life and it can prompt us to bring out the better parts of ourselves in ways we never expected. It is both a curse and a blessing. Typically we may have some glimmer of how it operates in our lives but mostly we’re unaware of how much of our existence is driven by shame. It is often the obscured answer to such questions as: “Why did he murder all those people? or “Why can’t … Continue reading

Restoring Resilience

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“Resilience is our essential nature, woven into our being as a natural capacity to restore and recover so that we can experience the joy and well being that are our birthright.” Dr. Henry Emmons, MD What is resilience? Is it strength, persistence, courage? Do you think about your resilience or another’s? Is resilience acquired or innate? “Resiliency is the rapidity with which we recover from adversity,” according to Richard Davidson, founder of The Center for Healthy Minds at UW-Madison. It is a learnable skill. By strengthening that skill we can recover from adversity more quickly. We cannot, however, avoid it. … Continue reading

from the publisher

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Someone asked me recently who my favorite teacher was. Ok, truth be told, it was one of those password questions on a website for Delta. But it got me thinking nonetheless – despite the lack of face-to-face contact. I thought of Sister Brown at Sacred Heart School. She taught me not to laugh at the class clown’s jokes for fear of being sent to the Bench of Shame in the hallway. I thought of George, a salty sailing instructor who taught me the difference between a beam reach and a broad reach and the trade-offs between thrill-seeking (it’s exhilerating!) and … Continue reading

If You Leave Me, Can I Come With You? Daily Meditations for Codependents and Al-Anons…with a Sense of Humor

IfYouLeaveMe

By Misti B. Beginning with New Year’s Day, readers will enjoy Misti B’s honest and humorous reflections on her experience as a codependent person who attends Al- Anon, a Twelve Step recovery program for individuals affected by the disease of alcoholism. She offers a year’s worth of daily meditations in a lighthearted manner. They are inspiring and delightful. Misti shares the valuable life lessons she learned and sayings she heard in and outside of the rooms of recovery. For example, after hearing a speaker discuss Step 8, she realized, “What I do directly reflects what I am inside. If I … Continue reading

Buddhism for Couples: A Calm Approach to Relationships

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By Sarah Napthali The first chapter is about the difficulty of living as a couple. Other chapters cover letting go, battling negativity, and anger. Each chapter includes her observations on that topic and how she applied Buddhist teachings, specifically Buddha’s Four Noble Truths. This has enabled her to see more clearly using non-judgmental observation. Each chapter closes with “Things to contemplate…” and “Things to do.” In the chapter on communication she provides her summary of communication in partnerships. For example, she suggests, “Stick to one point. Don’t discuss all your problems at once. You don’t have time.” Napthali suggests that … Continue reading

Calm

Calm

By Michael Acton Smith A 2005 study found people who regularly practiced mindfulness meditation physically change their brains. Smith states, “A calm practice, incorporating meditation and mindfulness, can be as effective in treating the symptoms of depression and anxiety as drug-based treatments.” Are you ready to change your brain? This is a beautiful book filled with colorful, easy to read pages of quotes and suggestions to help change your perspective and calm your life. It is based on the iPhone app and a calm app is provided to help start and continue a daily meditation practice. There is even a … Continue reading

Not as Prescribed: Recognizing and Facing Alcohol and Drug Misuse in Older Adults

NotAsPrescribed

By Harry Haroutunian, MD Drug misuse and addiction is one of the fastest growing and unrecognized health problems in the United States in older adults, which is defined as age fifty and older. AARP coordinated efforts with the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation to provide important information about substance misuse and addiction. Knowing the difference between normal signs of aging and misused drugs or addiction may help families identify drug misuse and abuse. Toxic combinations of prescription drugs, whether under a physician’s or several physicians’ care, can mimic aging or disguise addiction. The magnitude of this problem and the rationale why … Continue reading

NuWay Annual Picnic

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 FROM 3:00 – 6:00 P.M.NuWay is celebrating 50 years In the Heart of the Recovery Community.

Reader’s Write: Dealing with Depression in Recovery

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The worst part of having clinical depression is the crash that generally occurs after experiencing a ray of hope. Or, if I dare admit, after feeling “happy” for the better part of a day or two. However, there are times when I feel so low, that it takes unimaginable effort just to get out bed. These are times when simply eating or showering require too much energy. It only serves to crush my spirit even lower when a friend or perhaps an acquaintance in recovery offers comments such as, “You know of course, this is your choice to be depressed,” … Continue reading

I’d Give Anything

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It was many years ago, but I have never forgotten what my friend Al said to me on a warm summer evening in June. Jan and the kids were out of town one night in the summer of 1990, and my friend Al Kirsh and I spent an evening together as I played my tenor recorder and Al played our family piano. Al is an accomplished pianist. He’s one of those guys who sits down to play and in no time, a crowd gathers round to listen. He can play nearly anything and he does it with an ease and … Continue reading

Our Environment: The Beauty of Bees

maryrose remington

According to Becky Masterman, director of the Bee Squad Association Program at the University of Minnesota, there is both good and bad news when it comes to bees. “The good news is the media has done such a good job of letting the public know the bees are in trouble,” Becky says. The bad news — of course— is that the bees are in trouble. The Bee Squad at the University of Minnesota is the outreach arm for the University of Minnesota Bee Lab, under the guidance of nationally known and respected Dr. Marla Spivak. During beekeeping time (spring, summer … Continue reading

Healing From Abuse: Light Encourages Recovery

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In 2015 as the Children’s Theatre Company (CTC) in Minneapolis was hosting festive events to celebrate its 50th anniversary, a smaller, quieter happening began to ripple through the CTC alumni community. No fanfare, no hype, but to those involved, of greater celebratory significance. Thirty-one years had passed since the 1984 arrest of John Clark Donahue, the theater’s co-founder, and several other staff members on child sexual abuse charges. Donahue spent ten months in the Hennepin County workhouse; the other cases were dismissed or settled out-of-court. In May 1991 the Minneapolis Star Tribune ran a thoroughly-researched twopart feature by reporter Kay … Continue reading

Is it Time to Retreat?

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Retreat. Withdraw. Pull back. When armies retreat they fall back, de-escalate, leave the frontline for a place of safety and rest. Me, too. I go on retreat to regroup, refresh, rejuvenate. Our frenetic lives leave us fewer and fewer quiet places to retreat into. Electronic devices have marched into every room of the house. They ride with us, walk with us, sleep with us. News is broadcast all day. Phones ring, beep, vibrate incessantly. Even out-of-doors, too often machines swallow the stillness. It takes much more effort to retreat. And we need it more than ever. I contacted several retreat … Continue reading

Stepping into Life

Emily Roiphe Carter

When I hear the word retreat, I tend not to think of meditation, cedar scented cabins, or even a prettily situated lakeside bench. I think of troops of traumatized and malnourished shoulders slogging through mud to get back from the front lines, I think of standing in the doorway of a party and seeing some bad decision I’d made making his way to the front of the buffet line; I think of retreat as something to beat hastily in order to get somewhere I can I can let out that breath I didn’t realize I’d been holding. Like most people, … Continue reading