Op-ed

By Brittney Smith Recently considering the often used phrase, “Your health is your wealth,” I was forced to ask myself some tough questions: If wealth can’t buy happiness can it buy health? Can you be healthy and flat-ass broke? How is it remotely possible that we link ‘health’ and ‘wealth’ together when they are more than light years apart? My overall stance on that statement, considering their literal definitions, is that unfortunately health does not actually equate to wealth. Being free from illness and/or injury is not the same as having an abundance of material objects or money. On the … Continue reading

Letter to the Editor: Searching for relevance in the wake of Cecil’s death

 Mr. Goodwell Nzou garnered much attention from his New York Times opinion piece, In Zimbabwe, We Don’t Cry for Lions (August 4, 2015). He presented a condescending response to those who roared with anger or grief at the reported illegal slaying of an African lion who became much more famous in death than during his life. “Did all those Americans signing petitions understand that lions actually kill people?” Nzou challenged. Most of us found out about Cecil at the same time we learned that Walter Palmer had allegedly lured him out of a protected area and hunted him down. And … Continue reading

Letter to the Editor

Dear Reader, I can well appreciate your response to my article on parents who are abandoned by their children. Certainly people who were abused in childhood ought not be judged or pressured to reunite with their parents unless they are internally lead to do so. Some abused people actually may lessen their damage by trying to reconnect with parents. My intention in the article was to specifically address parents who were not abusive to their children who nevetherless get rejected today by their adult children. The example at the start illustrates this intent. Although I tried I could have been … Continue reading

Letter to the Editor

Letter to editor: Mary Lou Logsdon’s reflection on the ginkgo trees that line her street (“Letting Go,” November/December, 2014) was a reminder that many meaningful life lessons are gleaned by observing nature.  Her comments about “letting go,” based on the metaphor of trees losing their leaves in the fall, were not only thoughtful, but lyrical, as much akin to poetry as prose can get.  I’m saving her piece, so that I can share sections of it as the opening words for a future service at our Unitarian Universalist church.

Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor: Though I regularly find useful and supportive advice and information in The Phoenix Spirit, I was shocked by the tone of John Driggs’ latest column, which, in defending parents, came across as very blaming and shaming of (adult) children. Here are a couple quotes that were especially troubling: “… no matter how problematic our childrens’ childhoods were there is absolutely no justification for their rejecting us today from their lives.  If they do so, they are doing so out of their own spite and cluelessness, not because they were harmed in childhood. ” “All of us are obliged … Continue reading